An exhibition of works by world-renowned leader of the Op Art movement, Victor Vasarely (1906-1997) opens at the Haggin Museum on Thursday, June 2. This collection of approximately 100 works by the French-Hungarian artist spans over five decades and touches on several of his art series before and after Op Art emerged in the 1960s.

Optical Art (Op Art) is defined by its use of color and line to create the illusion of movement or depth. After 1965 the Op Art style began appearing in everyday life through graphics, advertisements, and design. As a founder of the art movement, Vasarely created some of the earliest known works of Op Art in the late 1930s and early 40s.

Following the Bauhaus principle that art should be interwoven into our everyday lives, Vasarely chose serigraphs as one of the many mediums to make his art easily accessible. Vasarely continued to extend his vision into new forms and systems that changed modern art. Though not always recognizable, Vasarely’s contributions to the arts, science, and technology industries can still be seen today in design, architecture, clothing, and even computers.